The Screaming Staircase, Lockwood & Co, Jonathan Stroud

Ghosts and dark days: The Screaming Staircase (Lockwood & Co. #1) by Jonathan Stroud

 

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When the dead come back to haunt the living, Lockwood & Co. step in. For more than fifty years, the country has been affected by a horrifying epidemic of ghosts. A number of Psychic Investigations Agencies have sprung up to destroy the dangerous apparitions. Lucy Carlyle, a talented young agent, arrives in London hoping for a notable career. Instead, she finds herself joining the smallest, most ramshackle agency in the city, run by the charismatic Anthony Lockwood. When one of their cases goes horribly wrong, Lockwood & Co. have one last chance of redemption. Unfortunately, this involves spending the night in one of the most haunted houses in England and trying to escape alive. Set in a city stalked by spectres, The Screaming Staircase is the first in a chilling new series full of suspense, humour and truly terrifying ghosts. Your nights will never be the same again.  (GoodReads, 2013)

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English Literature & Composition: Glossary of Literary Forms #cwp11x

Forms

A literary form, sometimes called a genre, is a category of literature. The forms can be defined by their technique, tone, content, or length. The distinctions between genres and forms are flexible.
Books

Comedy

Writing that deals with life in a humorous way, often making fun of people’s mistakes

Example: Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim

Fable

A short story that often uses talking animals as the main characters and teaches an explicit moral or lesson

ExampleAesop’s Fables

Fantasy

A story set in an imaginary world in which the characters usually have supernatural powers or abilities

ExampleHarry Potter books, by J.K. Rowling

Folktale

A story originally passed from one generation to another by word of mouth. Folktales typically have a moral or lesson.

Historical Fiction

A fictional story based on a real-time and place in history, mixing fact with fiction

Example: The Name of the Rose, by Umberto Eco

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Reading and more of it: The 2020 Swords & Stars Reading Challenge

Seems that I will be joining a challenge after another to fulfill my 100 books to be read in 2020. The 2020 Swords & Stars Reading Challenge is hosted byMs Noseina Book.

Note: The following are the rules quote directly of landing page for the 2020 Swords & Stars Reading Challenge.

The purpose of this challenge is to celebrate the Science Fiction and Fantasy genres. This challenge runs from January 1st to December 31st (midnight). The rules are as follows:

  • The goal of this challenge is to read one book that matches up with each one of the challenges.
  • You must create a sign-up blog post/video/bookstagram post and link it back to this page.
  • If you do not have a blog, you can link up a Goodreads shelf of the books you completed/reviewed.
  • You can sign up anytime up to December 31st.
  • Books count as long as they are read in 2020. This can be any format (print, audiobook, etc) and any page length other than specified in the challenges.
  • Whatever Goodreads counts, will count in this challenge this includes graphic novels and novellas.
  • Please use #SwordsnStars for Social Media Updates and be sure to link up your sign-up posts & wrap-ups.

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The words of the bards: Poetry Reading Challenge 2020

As for my wish to turn 2020 and the new decade into enlightenment, I have decided to participate in Savvy Verse and Wit’s Poetry Reading Challenge 2020.

The reading options:

  • One of the easiest, and possibly most difficult, will be getting people to sign up to read a poem-a-day through the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day service. The challenge is to read a poem-a-day for a week once per month and write about which poems were your favourite and why. You can write up a short blurb on your Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, or your blog. I’d love for you to share your experience in the comments each month.
  • Second, read at least 1 book of poetry (doesn’t have to be cover-to-cover) and write about your favourite poems and what you learned about yourself while reading those poems.
  • Third, if you want to go all out, feel free to read as many books of poetry as you can in one year and link to your reviews in the comments.

 

My preferences will be a blend of the first and second options; I will be reading poems for Poe, Dickinson, Shelley, and Lord Byron.

The Afterlife of my quest to examine my strength—or, The Afterlife Reading Challenge

Today marks the century of not blogging. The endless ‘to blog or not to blog’ dilemma must come to an end. Moreover, the fact of having a stalker (some men are mad, never takes no for an answer, never to understand: what is merely a pure friendship), which turned my life into the five stages of grief—to the understanding that I am too strong for this childish game.

2020 marks the beginning of a new decade, so I shall tickle the areas of fantasy and Gothic literature this year—like every day for my past 32 years on earth, which drew me to The Afterlife of Holly Chase by Cynthia Hand realizing that I wish to read more concerning the afterlife—in the aspect of amusing fictional manner, not hellish fires.

Because of Cynthia Hand‘s The Afterlife of Holly Chase, I will start a challenge of reading books that include: ‘The Afterlife of’; with a character that is living in-between life and death, fulfilling an achievement following their afterlife; or the setting in the afterlife.

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