Don Quixote Chapter-a-Day Read-along Day 1: Prologue and Poetry #quixotereadalong

 

Since I am a part of the 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-along, I started reading Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, which is 134 chapters; to keep the exact successive days, One Catholic Life counted the prologue to Part 1 as a chapter (and will do so again at the beginning of Part 2), thus the actual narrative starts January 2.

Don Quixote by Miguel de CervantesDon Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes is a story of a man who has become so fascinated by reading chivalric romances, that he determines to become a knight-errant himself. In the company of his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, his exploits blossom in all sorts of wonderful ways. While Quixote’s fancy often leads him astray–he tilts at windmills, imagining them to be giants–Sancho acquires cunning and a certain sagacity. Sane madman and wise fool, they roam the world together, and together they have haunted readers’ imaginations for nearly four hundred years.

With its experimental form and literary playfulness, Don Quixote generally has been recognized as the first modern novel. The book has had enormous influence on a host of writers, from Fielding and Sterne to Flaubert, Dickens, Melville, and Faulkner, who reread it once a year, “just as some people read the Bible.” (Goodreads)

Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes

Thus being as dreamy as the Don, I have lost my sense to the humour of Miguel de Cervantes. The fact of experiencing glee from a classic novel is merely new. Experiencing the fanciful poems by fictional characters, which they wrote for a fictional character, is a joyful occasion; because I have always dreamt what shall my favourite characters think of my acts. Will they speak of my chivalry and pride? or will they mock my childish acts? Thus a story about following the steps of glory as your heroes will consistently be close to my core existence.

Yet within the Prologue de Cervantes reflected his fears of not bringing a realistic or a philosophic story of great citations and references. He asked the reader to be gentle and to appreciate his work. Hence the wonderful time I took to reach Ch.3 (I have lost myself in his words). Though, I will respect the reading timetable and spread my word and reviews as they were already planned.

To stay on track with the chapter-a-day schedule, be sure to download the Chapter a Day Reading Schedule

Announcing: “The 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-Along”

It has always drawn me to classics as for this year I have restarted my The Classics Club reading goals. Thus it is with utmost pleasure, I will join “The 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-Along”

 

How to Participate in the 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-along

  • Get a copy of each of the four books listed below.
  • If you have your own blog, write a welcome post explaining why you are joining the read-along and what you hope to gain from it. Leave a link to your post in the comments section at the end of this post (One Catholic Life). If you don’t have a blog, you can leave your information in the comments section below as well.
  • Download the daily schedule: Nick’s Chapter a Day Reading Schedule 2019
  • Commit to reading a chapter a day. If you get behind or race ahead, no worries. Life happens.
  • If you feel like it, post a line a day from the current chapter on social media, using the hashtags listed below. I’ll be posting to Twitter and Facebook each day and I would love to read your thoughts, too. When you post, I would ask that you please respect the reading experience of those who may not know the full story. In other words, no spoilers!
  • You will find official 2019 read-along graphics at the bottom of this post. Feel free to use them on your website if you wish.
  • And be sure to subscribe to this blog to receive any read-along updates.

The goal of these chapter-a-day read-alongs is to encourage people to read books they might not otherwise read because of their length or age. With that in mind, I chose four classic novels that I think you’re really going to enjoy. Two of the novels are favourites of mine, and two of them are books I haven’t yet read by authors I like.
So, without further ado, here’s what’s on tap for 2019:

  • Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. #quixotereadalong
  • The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. #montecristoreadalong (Which I am excited for) 
  • Lilith by George MacDonald. #lilithreadalong
  • The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens. #curiosityshopreadalong

The 2019 Chapter-a-Day Reading Schedule

Here is the broad outline of the year:

  • Don Quixote: January 1 to May 8 (126 chapters plus 2 prologues = 128 days)
  • The Count of Monte Cristo: May 9 to September 2 (117 chapters = 117 days)
  • Lilith: September 3 to October 19 (47 chapters = 47 days)
  • The Old Curiosity Shop: October 20 to December 31 (73 chapters = 73 days)

So, 128+117+47+73 = 365 days. You can download a pdf of the entire year’s schedule in detail here: Nick’s Chapter a Day Reading Schedule 2019.

 

To join this read-along, please visit One Catholic Life

 

The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings #1): Thoughts on The Prologue till the end of Ch.3

It was a bright Wednesday afternoon when the newspapers had the weekly films; I have seen a poster of a great film that captured my mind. The Fellowship of the Ring accessed my life by 2003; I remember being just merely thirteen.

Continuing toward my weekly quest of collecting films and actors pictures fashioned by my teenage hands into my scrapbook. O! I admire how the years passed! It was not till 2004 when I finally introduced to the motion-pictures that were viewed over a cable channel.

A year passed unto execution the determination of obtaining the novels, and I did. Also, more years till I started reading the novels throughout Keen on Tolkien.

 

(The Lord of the Rings #1)

The Lord of the Rings is a fantasy novel in three volumes: The Fellowship of the RingThe Two Towers, and The Return of the King. The plot revolves around the quest to destroy the evil One Ring, forged by Sauron, the Lord of the Rings. Tolkien originally conceived The Lord of the Rings as one long story told in six books, but he instead divided it into three parts due to publishing demands.
(The Lord of the Rings Study Guide – Course Hero)

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The Classics Club: Scary book tag in honour of the Gothic month #CCdare

The Classics Club is celebrating the Gothic month #CCdare

with the scary book tag over Gothic Book Tag, so to join this frighting book tag, all you have to do is follow the rules -unlike a Gothic novel character, which always explores the horizon.

The rules are easy.

  • Answer the 13 questions with classic books in mind.
  • How you define ‘classic’ is up to you.
  • How you define ‘scary’ is up to you (it could be content, size of book, genre etc).
  • Add your link back here when you’re done.
  • If you’re feeling social, visit other blogs and leave a comment or share your thoughts on twitter, fb, instagram or goodreads using #CCgothicbooktag
  • Join in if you dare.

the_fall_of_the_house_of_usher_by_guidedbygreed

  1. Which classic book has scared you the most?
  2. Scariest moment in a book?
  3. Classic villain that you love to hate?
  4. Creepiest setting in a book?
  5. Best scary cover ever?
  6. Book you’re too scared to read?
  7. Spookiest creature in a book?
  8. Classic book that haunts you to this day?
  9. Favourite cliffhanger or unexpected twist?
  10. Classic book you really, really disliked?
  11. Character death that disturbed/upset you the most?
  12. List your top 5 Gothic/scary/horror classic reads.
  13. Share your scariest/creepiest quote, poem or meme.

As always the aim is to have fun and read more classic books.

Do you dare to be scared?

#CCgothicbooktag

My answers are as it follows:

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