The words of the bards: Poetry Reading Challenge 2020

As for my wish to turn 2020 and the new decade into enlightenment, I have decided to participate in Savvy Verse and Wit’s Poetry Reading Challenge 2020.

The reading options:

  • One of the easiest, and possibly most difficult, will be getting people to sign up to read a poem-a-day through the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day service. The challenge is to read a poem-a-day for a week once per month and write about which poems were your favourite and why. You can write up a short blurb on your Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, or your blog. I’d love for you to share your experience in the comments each month.
  • Second, read at least 1 book of poetry (doesn’t have to be cover-to-cover) and write about your favourite poems and what you learned about yourself while reading those poems.
  • Third, if you want to go all out, feel free to read as many books of poetry as you can in one year and link to your reviews in the comments.

 

My preferences will be a blend of the first and second options; I will be reading poems for Poe, Dickinson, Shelley, and Lord Byron.

SKETCHING THE ESSENCE OF INSANITY AND CRIME IN NETFLIX’S ALIAS GRACE (EPISODE FOUR)

This was originally posted for Sketching the Essence of Insanity and Crime in Netflix’s Alias Grace (Episode Four) | The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates as part of the Neo-Victorian reviews.

Within the enlightenment of emotions, humans have the liberty to develop opinions that become actions. Opinions grow over the course of a lifetime and, if they are taken in faith, they will be sincere. Yet if poisonous trees of sin surround an individual, they will nourish upon errors. Rappaccini’s Daughter is used to bring this idea to the fore at the beginning of the fourth instalment of Alias Grace.

Blessed are all simple emotions, be they dark or bright! It is the lurid intermixture of the two that produces the illuminating blaze of the infernal regions.

Nathaniel Hawthorne probes human emotions in this above quote, and how life may influence an individual beyond their genes. There are various conceivable changes that come together to form a personality. These include one’s place of residence and community. The experiences gained in everyday life throughout acquaintance, family, and the community unite; all influence our personality. (Essays, UK. (November 2013))

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Announcing: “The 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-Along”

It has always drawn me to classics as for this year I have restarted my The Classics Club reading goals. Thus it is with utmost pleasure, I will join “The 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-Along”

 

How to Participate in the 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-along

  • Get a copy of each of the four books listed below.
  • If you have your own blog, write a welcome post explaining why you are joining the read-along and what you hope to gain from it. Leave a link to your post in the comments section at the end of this post (One Catholic Life). If you don’t have a blog, you can leave your information in the comments section below as well.
  • Download the daily schedule: Nick’s Chapter a Day Reading Schedule 2019
  • Commit to reading a chapter a day. If you get behind or race ahead, no worries. Life happens.
  • If you feel like it, post a line a day from the current chapter on social media, using the hashtags listed below. I’ll be posting to Twitter and Facebook each day and I would love to read your thoughts, too. When you post, I would ask that you please respect the reading experience of those who may not know the full story. In other words, no spoilers!
  • You will find official 2019 read-along graphics at the bottom of this post. Feel free to use them on your website if you wish.
  • And be sure to subscribe to this blog to receive any read-along updates.

The goal of these chapter-a-day read-alongs is to encourage people to read books they might not otherwise read because of their length or age. With that in mind, I chose four classic novels that I think you’re really going to enjoy. Two of the novels are favourites of mine, and two of them are books I haven’t yet read by authors I like.
So, without further ado, here’s what’s on tap for 2019:

  • Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. #quixotereadalong
  • The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. #montecristoreadalong (Which I am excited for) 
  • Lilith by George MacDonald. #lilithreadalong
  • The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens. #curiosityshopreadalong

The 2019 Chapter-a-Day Reading Schedule

Here is the broad outline of the year:

  • Don Quixote: January 1 to May 8 (126 chapters plus 2 prologues = 128 days)
  • The Count of Monte Cristo: May 9 to September 2 (117 chapters = 117 days)
  • Lilith: September 3 to October 19 (47 chapters = 47 days)
  • The Old Curiosity Shop: October 20 to December 31 (73 chapters = 73 days)

So, 128+117+47+73 = 365 days. You can download a pdf of the entire year’s schedule in detail here: Nick’s Chapter a Day Reading Schedule 2019.

 

To join this read-along, please visit One Catholic Life

 

SKETCHING THE ESSENCE OF INSANITY AND CRIME IN NETFLIX’S ALIAS GRACE (EPISODE TWO)


This was originally posted for Sketching the Essence of Insanity and Crime in Netflix’s Alias Grace (Episode Two) | The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates as part of the Neo-Victorian reviews.

Introducing Mary Whitney

Introducing Mary Whitney – Alias Grace, 2017: S01 E01 (Netflix, inc.)

… for it is the fate of a woman
Long to be patient and silent, to wait like a ghost that is speechless,
Till some questioning voice dissolves the spell of its silence.
“The Courtship of Miles Standish” By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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SKETCHING THE ESSENCE OF INSANITY AND CRIME IN NETFLIX’S ALIAS GRACE (EPISODE ONE)

This was originally posted for Sketching the Essence of Insanity and Crime in Netflix’s Alias Grace (Episode One) | The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates as part of the Neo-Victorian reviews.

grace-marks-1

Sketches of Grace Marks and James McDermott from their trial in 1843. (Collection of the Toronto Public Library)

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