English Literature & Composition: Glossary of Literary Forms #cwp11x

Forms

A literary form, sometimes called a genre, is a category of literature. The forms can be defined by their technique, tone, content, or length. The distinctions between genres and forms are flexible.
Books

Comedy

Writing that deals with life in a humorous way, often making fun of people’s mistakes

Example: Kingsley Amis’s Lucky Jim

Fable

A short story that often uses talking animals as the main characters and teaches an explicit moral or lesson

ExampleAesop’s Fables

Fantasy

A story set in an imaginary world in which the characters usually have supernatural powers or abilities

ExampleHarry Potter books, by J.K. Rowling

Folktale

A story originally passed from one generation to another by word of mouth. Folktales typically have a moral or lesson.

Historical Fiction

A fictional story based on a real-time and place in history, mixing fact with fiction

Example: The Name of the Rose, by Umberto Eco

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The words of the bards: Poetry Reading Challenge 2020

As for my wish to turn 2020 and the new decade into enlightenment, I have decided to participate in Savvy Verse and Wit’s Poetry Reading Challenge 2020.

The reading options:

  • One of the easiest, and possibly most difficult, will be getting people to sign up to read a poem-a-day through the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day service. The challenge is to read a poem-a-day for a week once per month and write about which poems were your favourite and why. You can write up a short blurb on your Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, or your blog. I’d love for you to share your experience in the comments each month.
  • Second, read at least 1 book of poetry (doesn’t have to be cover-to-cover) and write about your favourite poems and what you learned about yourself while reading those poems.
  • Third, if you want to go all out, feel free to read as many books of poetry as you can in one year and link to your reviews in the comments.

 

My preferences will be a blend of the first and second options; I will be reading poems for Poe, Dickinson, Shelley, and Lord Byron.

On Reflections and Revelations of Blogging

It’s with utmost sadness and a broken heart to announce that my 11 years as Seraphina Reads are over. I have started SR back in New Year’s Eve of 2008 to be a place for MG and YA reviews, to serve authors, and speak about my favourite novels.

Yesterday, April 14, blogger.com decided it is enough for SR journey by blocking any attempts of signing in. I shall not shade tears upon my lost years, yet it is my time to move on; I have been blogging for the market, but not for myself. I have tried to please the world but not my heart; this is no more.

Glacier Mellow is where I feel safe and content, I would like to share some review requests and tours over it -side by side the academic atmosphere- with my voice not for the market.

I would like to expand nerdiness of my soul over GM; as being a fan of graphic novels and would like to share analyses of my latest watch list.

Life moves on and this is the correct choice for my age, it’s time to explore different aspects of my soul upon one place because there are already bind within my mind.

 

My upcoming writings will include Analyses to Mary Shelly’s Franknastine and A Christmas Carlo; Sketching the essence of insanity within Netflix’s Alias Grace (part five and six).

Moreover, I would like to share my failer to continue reading Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes for the 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-along, yet I plan to finish it alongside the next book; The Count of Monte Cristo.

 

 

SKETCHING THE ESSENCE OF INSANITY AND CRIME IN NETFLIX’S ALIAS GRACE (EPISODE FOUR)

This was originally posted for Sketching the Essence of Insanity and Crime in Netflix’s Alias Grace (Episode Four) | The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates as part of the Neo-Victorian reviews.

Within the enlightenment of emotions, humans have the liberty to develop opinions that become actions. Opinions grow over the course of a lifetime and, if they are taken in faith, they will be sincere. Yet if poisonous trees of sin surround an individual, they will nourish upon errors. Rappaccini’s Daughter is used to bring this idea to the fore at the beginning of the fourth instalment of Alias Grace.

Blessed are all simple emotions, be they dark or bright! It is the lurid intermixture of the two that produces the illuminating blaze of the infernal regions.

Nathaniel Hawthorne probes human emotions in this above quote, and how life may influence an individual beyond their genes. There are various conceivable changes that come together to form a personality. These include one’s place of residence and community. The experiences gained in everyday life throughout acquaintance, family, and the community unite; all influence our personality. (Essays, UK. (November 2013))

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Don Quixote Chapter-a-Day Read-along Day 1: Prologue and Poetry #quixotereadalong

 

Since I am a part of the 2019 Chapter-a-Day Read-along, I started reading Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, which is 134 chapters; to keep the exact successive days, One Catholic Life counted the prologue to Part 1 as a chapter (and will do so again at the beginning of Part 2), thus the actual narrative starts January 2.

Don Quixote by Miguel de CervantesDon Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes is a story of a man who has become so fascinated by reading chivalric romances, that he determines to become a knight-errant himself. In the company of his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, his exploits blossom in all sorts of wonderful ways. While Quixote’s fancy often leads him astray–he tilts at windmills, imagining them to be giants–Sancho acquires cunning and a certain sagacity. Sane madman and wise fool, they roam the world together, and together they have haunted readers’ imaginations for nearly four hundred years.

With its experimental form and literary playfulness, Don Quixote generally has been recognized as the first modern novel. The book has had enormous influence on a host of writers, from Fielding and Sterne to Flaubert, Dickens, Melville, and Faulkner, who reread it once a year, “just as some people read the Bible.” (Goodreads)

Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes

Thus being as dreamy as the Don, I have lost my sense to the humour of Miguel de Cervantes. The fact of experiencing glee from a classic novel is merely new. Experiencing the fanciful poems by fictional characters, which they wrote for a fictional character, is a joyful occasion; because I have always dreamt what shall my favourite characters think of my acts. Will they speak of my chivalry and pride? or will they mock my childish acts? Thus a story about following the steps of glory as your heroes will consistently be close to my core existence.

Yet within the Prologue de Cervantes reflected his fears of not bringing a realistic or a philosophic story of great citations and references. He asked the reader to be gentle and to appreciate his work. Hence the wonderful time I took to reach Ch.3 (I have lost myself in his words). Though, I will respect the reading timetable and spread my word and reviews as they were already planned.

To stay on track with the chapter-a-day schedule, be sure to download the Chapter a Day Reading Schedule